Marquette COVID-19 Dashboard reveals highest single-day increase in positive cases

Marquette%27s+COVID-19+dashboard+revealed+the+highest+single-day+increase+in+positive+cases+since+the+start+of+fall+semester%2C+bringing+the+total+number+of+campus+cases+to+97.

Marquette’s COVID-19 dashboard revealed the highest single-day increase in positive cases since the start of fall semester, bringing the total number of campus cases to 97.

Twenty-two positive student cases of COVID-19 were reported Friday, according to the Marquette coronavirus dashboard. This is the highest single-day increase the campus has seen since classes began.

The total number of cases since Aug. 21 is now at 97. Of those cases, 91 are students.

A total of 223 tests were administered through the Marquette Medical Clinic as of yesterday and 21 students had tested positive. The positive cases comprised approximately 9% of the total number of tests reported.

Nine cases were reported Thursday.

The dashboard also features gating criteria to measure the university’s response level for certain categories, such as the percentage of tests that come back positive and the amount of quarantine space that is available.

The gating criterion for cases has currently moved into the yellow. This means that the 7-day average for the percentage of tests that return positive is between five and ten percent. The university rated its 7-day positive average at a red earlier this week, which means more than ten percent of cases came back positive. A green rating for this criterion would be less than five percent of tests returning positive. 

Additionally, the dashboard shows an overall alert level, which indicate the severity of COVID-19 on campus, according to Marquette’s Step 4 recovery plan. Marquette has remained on the moderate alert level since classes began Aug. 26.

The surge in cases reported Friday follows the quarantining of Schroeder Hall students Sept. 14 after 3% of the hall’s 373 students, or approximately 11 students, tested positive.

This story is developing.

This story was written by Benjamin Wells. He can be reached at benjamin.wells@marquette.edu