Business school expands executive-in-residence program

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Photo by Josh Meitz

The expansion consists of the addition of five new mentors for students in the college who are all former executives.

The College of Business Administration has expanded its executive-in-residence program. This expansion consists of the addition of five new mentors for students in the college who are all former executives.

The executive-in-residence program exists within Marquette with the goal of getting business school students to become more engaged, as well provide students with mentors.

Tim Hanley, acting dean of the College of Business Administration, graduated from Marquette as a business student in 1978. Hanley held senior positions at Deloitte, the largest professional services organization in the United States. In October of 2019, Hanley was announced as the first executive-in-residence.

Hanley said due to certain circumstances, the program was paused, but now they were able to start up the program again and include more executives in it. The original plan consisted of one executive, but the recent chance made an addition of five new executives.

“Due in part to the tragic passing of Dr. Joe Daniels and my appointment to the role of Acting Dean, and then the subsequent impact of the pandemic, for a time the program was put on hold. However, recently we were able to revisit the program, and we found an opportunity to bring on several individuals who were really passionate about the idea,” Hanley said.

The new executives to join the program are Mark Naidicz (human resources), Bob Love (accounting), Jim Stollberg (supply chain management), Dan Tranchita (applied investment management) and David Reeves (innovation and technology). Hanley said that faculty within the College of Business Administration will help students connect with these mentors.

Hanley said that the goal of the expansion is for students to get a taste of what it’s like to be a part of the business world. He said that through these interactions, students will be able to learn certain skills such as networking that will help them in their future careers.

 “I think the goal ultimately is to create value for our students, to provide them the opportunity to really connect with these individuals who have led successful careers, learn from their insights, experience their leadership approach, and be mentored and given advice,” Hanley said.

Eleanora Malouf, a sophomore in the College of Business Administration, is pursuing a career in marketing and entrepreneurship. Malouf said that her favorite part about the college is the support she gets from the faculty, as well as having a mentor. She said that having a mentor has been an integral part of her journey in the business school.

“Having a mentor has been super awesome, as I have been able to go to her when needing advice regarding internships, classes, resume help, etc.,” Malouf said. “By having a mentor who had a similar experience as me at Marquette has really helped as they understand and can relate to the advice, I need from them.”

Gus Chiarello, a sophomore in the College of Business Administration, is a part of the Applied Investment Management program, as well as the commercial banking program. He said that he found a lot of mentors through these programs, and has found his conversations and connections with mentors to be very helpful in networking.

“I think it is very beneficial to have someone in the area you pursue because they will help you expand your network. Everyone tells me that connections are the most important part of being successful, if someone helps you build your network it can go a long way,” Chiarello said.

Hanley said he has very high hopes for the impact of the expansion and is already starting to see students becoming more involved in connecting with the new mentors.

“It’s something that is symbolic of the types of students we want to cultivate through a Marquette Business education, young men and women who want to give back to others throughout all aspects of their career, whether they are just getting a start or are perhaps moving on to another stage later in life,” Hanley said.

This story was written by Phoebe Goebel. She can be reached at phoebe.goebel@marquette.edu