Beyond Boundaries event focuses on strategic planning, higher education

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Beyond Boundaries event focuses on strategic planning, higher education

Marquette community members join together to talk about the university's strategic plan, Beyond Boundaries.

Marquette community members join together to talk about the university's strategic plan, Beyond Boundaries.

Photo by Claire Gallagher

Marquette community members join together to talk about the university's strategic plan, Beyond Boundaries.

Photo by Claire Gallagher

Photo by Claire Gallagher

Marquette community members join together to talk about the university's strategic plan, Beyond Boundaries.

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Marquette University held “Think Different, Act Different to go Beyond Boundaries” in the Monaghan Ballroom in the Alumni Memorial Union Monday, hosting more than 450 Marquette faculty, staff and students.

The community members were brought together to reflect on issues facing higher education, and to envision possible solutions and strategically planned themes within Beyond Boundaries, a strategic plan that outlines the university’s options for the Campus Master Plan. The master plan serves as a roadmap for Marquette’s capital projects.

Beyond Boundaries is a plan built around the six themes the university is continuously working on, which are Pursuit of Academic Excellence for Human Well-Being, Research in Action, A Culture of Inclusion, Social Responsibility through Community Engagement, Formation of Hearts and Minds, and Sustainability of Valuable Resources. 

Attendees heard from Beyond Boundaries leaders Jeanne Hossenlopp, vice president for research and innovation, and Lora Strigens, vice president for planning and facilities management, about breaking down barriers between the strategic plan themes and ensuring Beyond Boundaries continues to adapt to change, according to the event description.

A Oct. 14 university news release stated the “think different” slogan was a “reverent nod to one of Apple’s more famous ad campaigns about being innovative and pushing boundaries.” The “think different” campaign was initiated by the late Steve Jobs in 1997, with Apple using it until 2002.

Kyle Rotunno, a freshman in the College of Business Administration, said the event was important for the future of the university.

“Marquette is a fine institution, and I commend President Lovell, the faculty and staff for the hard work they are putting in as well as being willing to make important changes when needed,” Rotunno said. 

On one of the walls of the Monaghan Ballroom, numerous pictures were hung, each of them representing a strategic planning theme. After Hossenlopp and Strigens, Lovell offered his own remarks, focusing significant changes facing higher education.   

Jennifer Vanderheyden, an assistant professor of French and francophone studies, said Hossenlopp and Strigens were thoughtful in their future plans for the university.

“I thought that they gave a good overview and direction on innovative ideas,” Vanderheyden said. 

Vanderheyden also spoke about the purpose of the pictures the faculty came up with as well as the purpose of the activities that the faculty participated in.  

“We did a lot of discussing and brainstorming topics in groups regarding issues such as sustainability and academic excellence,” Vanderheyden said. 

Mark Konewko, a professor of music, said the Beyond Boundaries will help students succeed as the university continues to address the issues that were brought to light at the event.

“It is important because Marquette wants its students to succeed and it doesn’t always happen. So, we are trying to fine-tune the good work Marquette does,” Konewko said. 

Konewko said he appreciates that Lovell included Marquette staff in the campus conversation surrounding Beyond Boundaries. 

“President Lovell is a man of vision and humble enough to realize the potential of the staff,” Konewko said. 

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