EDITORIAL: Be safe on National Marquette Day

Students+who+are+unsafe+on+National+Marquette+Day+may+have+to+go+to+the+emergency+room.+

Photo by Josh Meitz

Students who are unsafe on National Marquette Day may have to go to the emergency room.

National Marquette Day should be a day to celebrate each other and the Marquette bond that we share. This also means making sure we are all safe and care for one another. 

While Saturday, Feb. 26 is a day to have fun, acting in unsafe manners is an easy way to ruin it, potentially putting each others’ health and well-being at risk.

People intending to drink should also be responsible and know their limits. Drinking past limits could not only lead to alcohol poisoning but also put people in dangerous situations. Additionally, having to go to the emergency room due to alcohol poisoning could take space away from someone with an unavoidable medical emergency, such as a severe COVID-19 case.

It’s also important that students be the difference and take action if they see other students who are in unsafe situations on National Marquette Day. Every first-year student living on campus participates in Red Band Watch training, which teaches students how to recognize the signs of acute intoxication and how to intervene in potentially dangerous situations. 

Students should remember and even revisit this training before National Marquette Day, keeping in mind the signs of a life-threatening overdose: the person cannot be woken up, they get sick and don’t wake up, they have slow breathing or cold, clammy or altered skin.  

If you are unsure if someone needs help, it is better to be proactive and cautious. Call 911. Know when it’s time to get help. Someone’s health is also more important than getting in trouble. 

If you are alone and need assistance, call a friend, someone you trust or 911. 

Additionally, people should not try to peer pressure others into drinking or doing things they don’t want to do. Some students may also struggle with addiction and mental health issues, so pressuring them into drinking may be triggering and put them in unsafe situations. 

Consent is also important. If someone cannot offer consent, do not try to have sex with them, or try to pressure them into having sex. It’s that simple. 

There are a lot of events this upcoming weekend on campus where students can have fun and be sober. 

Marquette University Student Government is handing out beads and stickers among other spirit wear at The Commons from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 26. 

The Commons is also hosting a brunch party from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. as well as a watch party for the men’s basketball game at 12 p.m. Feb. 26. Marquette is hosting a pep rally and brunch at 10 a.m. at Mecca Bar and Grill. There will also be a Late Night Breakfast event hosted by Late Night Marquette later that day at 9 p.m. 

Students can also go to the men’s basketball game at 12 p.m. at Fiserv Forum. 

The day after National Marquette Day, there will also be a pregame reception at the Union Sports Annex at 12 p.m. as well as a women’s basketball game at 2 p.m. in the Al McGuire Center Feb. 27. 

Dressing appropriately for the weather on Saturday is also important, considering the current weather forecast predicts a 30-degree and below day.  

We must also be mindful of the communities living near Marquette, making sure to be respectful of property and noise levels. While National Marquette Day is a time to celebrate the Marquette community, we need to remember that we are closely knit with nearby communities. 

Regardless of how students choose to celebrate, making safe decisions and being aware of your surroundings and friends is essential to having a fun National Marquette Day. 


Editorial topics by the Marquette Wire are decided at weekly meetings between members of the executive board. The editorial is crafted with leadership by the executive opinions editor. The executive board consists of the executive director of the Wire, managing editor of the Marquette Tribune, managing editor of the Marquette Journal, general manager of MUTV, general manager of MUR and ten additional top editors across the organization.