Marquette bans motorized scooters on university-owned property

Samuel+Johnson%2C+a+junior+in+the+College+of+Arts+%26+Sciences%2C+rides+his+scooter+down+Wisconsin+Avenue.
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Marquette bans motorized scooters on university-owned property

Samuel Johnson, a junior in the College of Arts & Sciences, rides his scooter down Wisconsin Avenue.

Samuel Johnson, a junior in the College of Arts & Sciences, rides his scooter down Wisconsin Avenue.

Samuel Johnson, a junior in the College of Arts & Sciences, rides his scooter down Wisconsin Avenue.

Samuel Johnson, a junior in the College of Arts & Sciences, rides his scooter down Wisconsin Avenue.

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The university is banning motorized scooters on Marquette’s campus effective immediately, according to a news release.

The ban includes scooters from rental companies like Lime, Bird and Spin, and any other motorized scooters.

The new policy covers walkways and green spaces on university-owned property, university spokesperson Chris Stolarski said in an email. Individuals can continue riding the scooters on public streets, including those that run through campus such as Wisconsin Avenue.

The Marquette University Police Department will enforce the new ban. MUPD will also enforce the City of Milwaukee ordinance that prohibits using the scooters on sidewalks, a law which has a violation fine of $86.20

The Office of Residence Life has an existing policy that states scooters cannot be charged in residence halls or university-owned apartments, according to the news release.

Marquette University Student Government said it supports the university in its policy to ban motorized scooters on campus.

“Despite the affordability and accessibility of motorized scooters, MUSG understands the evidence that points to the dangers posed by these scooters to riders and pedestrians,” MUSG said in a statement.

The university news release cited a study from the Journal of the American Medical Association that said about 250 individuals were admitted to two urban emergency rooms in the last year in connection to scooter collisions.

This story is developing.

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