The Great Debate

YES OR NO TO PANTSUITS?

Zoe Marmitt, a junior in the College of Engineering, says yes to pantsuits. She sees it as a very professional look and as a matter of gender equality.

“I feel like men wear suits, so women (should have) equal rights,” Marmitt says. “Women should be treated just as fairly as men, so pantsuits all the way.”

Liam Bower, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences, notes the attention given to women’s clothing choices, specifically concerning the topic of women and political fashion.

“I think we, as a society, focus way too much on what women wear,” Bower says.

WHAT COLOR SHOULD THE WHITE HOUSE REALLY BE?

Seamus McDermott, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences, says he thinks the White House should, in fact, be a different color to mix it up.

“I think it could be a mix, (like) stone for the first half and like a tan color on the top,” McDermott says. “It shouldn’t just be one (because) in a new millennium, it deserves a different style.”

On the other hand, Alyssa Sherman, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences, thinks the White House should stick to its well-known white color.

“I like the white. … It fits in with all the rest of the buildings (there),” Sherman says.

SHOULD THE UNITED STATES STICK WITH A PRESIDENT OR GO KING AND QUEEN?

Brian Coe, a first-year law student, says he thinks the United States should keep the democratic system.

“(Having a) president has worked well for the past 250 years,” Coe says.

Riya Bhasin, a sophomore in the College of Health Sciences, says she also thinks the presidential system should be kept in place.

“If we establish a king and queen, that’s a system that America itself didn’t accept in the first place,” Bhasin says.

She also says the difficulty in determining who would be the successor, especially since the position would not be earned but given due to entitlement. She says there wouldn’t be any work to show for the deserved title.

WHO HAD THE BETTER SPEECH: PATRICK HENRY OR ABRAHAM LINCOLN?

Patrick Henry, attorney, planter, orator and former governor of Virginia, famously said, “Give me liberty or give me death” and Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, delivered his famous Gettysburg Address starting with “Four score and seven years ago …”

Bower argues that Lincoln had the better speech “because it’s about the most polarized topic.”

“It’s bringing us together through the values that established our country (and) it’s that unity, and not so much tearing apart, we need,” Bower says.

McDermott says he is a bigger fan of the Lincoln speech, especially the ending that states “the dead shall not have died in vain.”

SHOULD THE WHITE POWDERED WIG TREND COME BACK?

Sherman says she thinks only the judiciary should all still be required to wear powdered wigs but not the legislative branch because there are a lot of members of the legislative branch.

Dev Desai, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences agrees. He thinks the judiciary branch, specifically Supreme Court justices, should still wear head pieces.

McDermott, on the other hand, thinks the legislative branch should also wear powdered wigs.

“You think about when a judge walks into a courtroom (and) when he puts on a robe, he takes on the seriousness,” McDermott says. “I think our legislatures should take on that sort of symbolism.”

COFFEE OR TEA?

With tea having its symbolic beginnings in the U.S. during the Boston Tea Party, and coffee being a staple across the nation, ideas differ about the merits of both beverages.

Elle Steiner, a sophomore in the College of Health Sciences, says she is more of a coffee kind of person.

“Coffee is just a hardy, full drink whereas tea is more fragile … when I want to be ready for business, I get the coffee, but when I’m feeling sick I go for tea,” Steiner said.

Bower, on the other hand, thinks teatime should be brought back on Saturday’s and Sunday’s, specifically.

BEST POLITICAL TV SHOW

With many political TV shows out there, it’s hard to talk about just one and analyze the accuracy of its content because, after all, TV is entertainment.

Desai says his favorite TV show is “House of Cards.”

“Bill Clinton did say that it’s a very accurate show,” Desai says.

Bower says his favorite political show is “Last Week Tonight with John Oliver.”

“He’s funny, but he has really good statistics and political commentary,” Bower says.

SHOULD PRESIDENTS’ FACES BE ON CREDIT CARDS?

Since the presidents have their faces on the physical currency in the United States, this begs the question: Should their faces be on credit cards?

Bianca Garcia, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences, says she thinks instead of presidents, there should be historical events on credit cards. She also says it could be hard for some people to keep their political views private.

“I say no to presidents on credit cards … (some) want keep their political views private, but when you use that credit card, people can know,” Garcia says.

Coe also says how he thinks historical events would be a good idea.

“We’re more idolizing our great nation and the events rather than the presidents,” Coe says.

He also says that if people had the same presidents on their cards, it would be hard to easily and efficiently determine specific credit cards because of the similar design.

This story was written by Ariana Madson. She can be reached at ariana.madson@marquette.edu.