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Student wellness center partners with Late Night Marquette to host Mind, Body, Soul event

The+student+wellness+center+and+Late+Night+Marquette+hosted+the+Mind.+Body.+Soul.+event+at+Marquette+Place+in+the+Alumni+Memorial+Union+Sept.+21.
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Student wellness center partners with Late Night Marquette to host Mind, Body, Soul event

The student wellness center and Late Night Marquette hosted the Mind. Body. Soul. event at Marquette Place in the Alumni Memorial Union Sept. 21.

The student wellness center and Late Night Marquette hosted the Mind. Body. Soul. event at Marquette Place in the Alumni Memorial Union Sept. 21.

Photo by Andrew Himmelberg

The student wellness center and Late Night Marquette hosted the Mind. Body. Soul. event at Marquette Place in the Alumni Memorial Union Sept. 21.

Photo by Andrew Himmelberg

Photo by Andrew Himmelberg

The student wellness center and Late Night Marquette hosted the Mind. Body. Soul. event at Marquette Place in the Alumni Memorial Union Sept. 21.

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The student wellness center and Late Night Marquette hosted the Mind. Body. Soul. event at Marquette Place in the Alumni Memorial Union Sept. 21.

Students had the opportunity to participate in “glowga” (glow-in-the-dark yoga), DIY activities and painting. The event was led by wellness peer educators who work in the student wellness center.

Sophomore Veronica Maniak in the College of Health Sciences, one of the wellness peer educators, said the student wellness center partners with Late Night Marquette for two events during the school year.

Maniak said that one idea they wanted to focus on for the event was “art is therapy.” She said that students could paint on canvases, color and make their own heating pads and essential oil diffusers and rollers.

“It’s important for students to be able to take a break and decompress,” Maniak said. She also said the event was a positive way to bring students together and create a relaxing environment.

Another wellness peer educator Paige Bintz, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences, said the Mind. Body. Soul. event was a great way for students to clear their heads.

“There is more to well being than the physicality of it,” Bintz said. 

Another wellness peer educator, Jackie Labonite, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences, said that coming to events like Mind. Body. Soul. are especially important for freshmen because they may stick with the people on their floor or in their groups. She said the event was a great way to reach out and connect with other people interested in wellness.

Labonite said she’s been doing work in the student wellness center for three years. She said she went to an all-girls high school where she did a lot of advocacy work. Labonite said she wanted to be around similar people who carried themselves in a holistic manner.

Maniak said she got involved with the student wellness center because she wanted to help other students.

“The student wellness center promotes holistic health,” Maniak said. She said they focus on not only physical well being, but mental well being.

She said as a wellness peer educator she engages in peer-to-peer education with students on how to set and keep goals, help motivate them to stay healthy and encourage them to get involved in groups on campus.

Maniak also said the student wellness center coaches students on how to succeed, live healthier lifestyles and manage stress.

A student attending the event, Marisa Strobel, a sophomore in the College of Engineering, said she thinks it is important for students to come to events like Mind. Body. Soul. She also said she believes it is important to form a cohesive campus and understand everyone’s goals.

“We also educate (students) on health and wellness topics that may not get a voice like sexual violence education and alcohol and drug use on campus,” Maniak said.

Bintz said the student wellness center also helps lead the Red Watch Band training for freshmen and sophomores. 

In an email, Sara Smith, the director of alcohol and other drug prevention and education programs, said the Red Watch Band training “focuses on recognizing the signs and symptoms of acute intoxication and teaches (students) the skills and strategies to effectively intervene” in life-threatening situations.

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