Educational Opportunity Program goes ‘Green’

The Educational Opportunity Program at Marquette is under new leadership, and the recently appointed Director Joseph Green has his eyes on being much more than just an administration head.

The EOP acts as an umbrella department for the four TRIO programs at Marquette. The TRIO programs are federally funded programs for first-generation students and students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

The four TRIO programs Marquette offers are Upward Bound, Upward Bound Math & Science, McNair Scholars Program and Student Support Services.

Green, hired as EOP director two weeks ago, has a wealth of experience in the educational field and is a graduate of Student Support Services.

“(Student Support Services) was a really big help in my educational career,” Green said. “I just felt it was my responsibility to give back to the students and help them to achieve.”

Green got his start as a high school social studies teacher in 1993 at Poinciana High School in Kissimmee, Fla. He was also dean of students at a Milford High School in Milford, Del. and acted as a liaison for at-risk students.

Aside from being a graduate of the TRIO programs, Green has an extensive familiarity with the programs while working in a similar capacity at other colleges for 15 years.

In 1996, Green became coordinator for Student Support Services at Bowie State University, a college in Maryland. He later took command of the McNair Scholars Program at Bowie until he left in 2000.

After a stay at Norfolk University and North Carolina Agriculture & Technology State University, Green arrived at the University of Central Florida in 2004. First acting as director of the school’s Research and Mentoring Program and undergraduate studies, Green also brought the McNair Scholars Program to UCF, and was its director.

His most recent job prior to coming to Marquette was at University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where in 2006 he started as director of the Upward Bound program.

Green sees his job as not only helping students, but also communicating directly with students, even being part of the teaching faculty as a professor in political science at Norfolk, North Carolina A&T and UCF.

Green said although he is not on the teaching faculty at Marquette, he would “welcome any opportunity to teach,” but does not have any plans to become a tenure-track professor at the moment.

Shawnda Herring, who worked with Green at UNC-Chapel Hill, said his willingness and dedication to students is what makes him successful.

“Dr. Green is an excellent example for the students,” Herring said. “His background is very similar to theirs, yet he’s achieved much through education. He’s an excellent asset.”

Helping students find their place in college is what Green takes pride in the most.

“Working with the EOP and TRIO allows me to help students who may have no idea what they want to do in college,” Green said. “Helping to impact students’ lives and exposing them to careers and other successful paths of life — you just can’t put a price on it.”

Anne Deahl, associate vice provost for academic support programs and a member of the search committee that recommended Green, said Green’s quality of work and dedication were big factors in his hiring.

“The search committee and I felt Dr. Green brought the right blend of experience, commitment, vision and enthusiasm to Marquette,” Deahl said.