Sororities begin its recruitment of new members

The five Marquette University Panhellenic Association sororities began their formal recruitment Wednesday, kicking off five days of recruitment activities for potential new members.

Registered women are invited to attend every event this week. The events are designed to help potential new members decide which of the five chapters they would feel the most comfortable pledging. Alpha Chi Omega, Alpha Phi, Alpha Xi Delta, Pi Beta Phi and Sigma Kappa are the sororities participating in this week’s recruitment.

Maggie Homer, Panhellenic Association vice president of membership, said preparations for this week have gone smoothly and she feels thoroughly geared up for recruitment.

“It’s great because at Marquette, recruitment isn’t seen as a competition,” said Homer, a senior in the College of Health Sciences. “Our sororities work together instead of competing against each other. We are all willing to work together to make recruitment as successful as possible, and this is what really sets our Greek system apart from others.”

According to Homer, 166 potential new members are currently registered for recruitment. She said the registration goal for this year is 200 women.

Those who pledge to a sorority at the end of the process has also been on the rise, with 11.7 percent of Marquette women being sorority members in the spring of 2009, compared to 11.2 percent in 2008.

The quota, or number of girls who may join each chapter, depends on the number of potential new members that remains by Saturday — “Preference Night.” Homer said she hopes the Panhellenic Association will reach their goal of 25 to 30 girls per chapter.

“Marquette recruitment is really concerned about the (potential member) finding the chapter best for them and where they will be the happiest,” said Ashleigh Trbovic, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences and a 2010 recruitment counselor.

Recruitment counselors are current sorority members who help potential members with the recruitment process. Starting in December, recruitment counselors completely disaffiliate from their sororities to help potential new members in the most objective manner possible.

Jennifer Norenberg, a freshman in the College of Health Sciences, said that despite her fear of the unknown as a recruit, Greek life appeals to her because of the possibility of new friendships.

“I want to get more involved and meet new people,” Norenberg said. “I was really involved in high school, and since I’ve been in college I feel like I haven’t gotten the chance to get involved as I want to be.”

Homer said a sorority’s philanthropy work helps potential new members make initial connections to a chapter.

“Sometimes as a freshman you can be scared to go out and do these things on your own when you don’t know a lot of people, so it’s hard to get involved,” Homer said. “As a Greek, you have 70 other sisters to do this with.”

Trbovic said her experiences within Greek life have helped her realize her potential. She also said she has found support and encouragement that is unattainable anywhere else.

“You don’t know it now, but the people you meet during recruitment you will know and befriend for the next three years of your life,” Trbovic said.