O-Fest offers diverse involvement

Clubs+recruit+prospective+members+with+the+help+of+email+lists.
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O-Fest offers diverse involvement

Clubs recruit prospective members with the help of email lists.

Clubs recruit prospective members with the help of email lists.

Photo by Matthew Serafin

Clubs recruit prospective members with the help of email lists.

Photo by Matthew Serafin

Photo by Matthew Serafin

Clubs recruit prospective members with the help of email lists.

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Central Mall will be bustling with students this Wednesday for the biannual Organization Fest. The event runs from 4-7 p.m. and will provide students with opportunities to get involved in the campus community.

For many students, O-Fest provides an opportunity to find a home away from home on campus.

Danny Throop, a junior in the College of Arts & Sciences, got involved with men’s club volleyball by attending O-Fest as a transfer student his sophomore year. Before he transferred he played Division III NCAA. Throop was looking for an opportunity to play competitive volleyball at Marquette.

I went (to O-Fest) to see what clubs I was interested in, and I met … the current president (of the team), at the booth and he asked me to come to tryouts,” Throop said.

Men’s club volleyball is as competitive as a sport gets before it is part of the NCAA, Throop said. He said it is great for students who played volleyball in high school and are looking to continue playing in college and meet new people.

“We bonded quite a bit last year, so I think we’re excited to see where new talent comes in and what we can do with the current talent we have,” Throop said.

He said he encourages students to join the team.

“It’s a good place to meet people, stay competitive and stay active as well as being involved on campus,” Throop said.

Throop said he believes O-Fest is an essential “one-stop shop” for students seeking to find out what clubs are available on campus. In addition to being in club volleyball, Throop works as a university tour guide and gives advice to prospective students.

“One of the things I always say about the community here is that if you are willing to put yourself out there, people are certainly going to give back to you and I think you can find a lot of opportunities, especially through O-Fest,” Throop said.

Miranda Keller, a sophomore in the College of Communication, said she decided to go through recruitment after attending O-Fest. Now a member of Alpha Chi Omega, she said she feels grateful to have found a supportive group.

“(Joining a sorority) was really good for me because I did cheerleading all through high school, so I had my girl gang, and then I came here and I didn’t,” Keller said. “Being in a sorority … it’s really nice to know that there are women who are going to support me and be there for me whenever I need them.”

I’m First, a new organization on campus, provides first-generation college students with information and resources. It will be at O-Fest.

Kimberly Murillo, a senior in the College of Arts & Sciences and involvement coordinator of I’m First, said when she was going into freshman year of high school, she didn’t know nearly as much about the resources available for first-generation college students as she does now.

“We want to help out those first-generation students so they’re not as lost as we were when we started,” Murillo said.

I’m First also creates a family and support system for first-generation students on campus.

“For first-generation students, moving away from family is really hard,” Murillo said. “Especially if they are low income, it is hard for them to travel back home.”