For the ‘health’ of it

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Turning 80 might indicate health concerns to some, but not to Student Health Service.

SHS celebrated its 80th anniversary Wednesday at its facility in the Schroeder Health Complex from 3 to 5 p.m.

Students, faculty and staff were invited to listen to several presentations and witness the development of SHS through graphics. The visitors sampled hors d'oeuvres and an anniversary cake. The event also included an anniversary raffle.

SHS Director Dana Mills describes the 80th anniversary as an important milestone.

"I think that it is quite notable that Marquette was one of the first universities to recognize and appreciate the value and contribution of college health services to the growth and development of students," Mills said. "We want the university community to know that we are proud of our legacy of service to the Marquette community and very much look forward to continuing our care of students in the true spirit of our Jesuit heritage."

According to SHS records, when the facility opened it ran sanitary inspections through all campus housing, offered a student health course and provided health examinations for all incoming freshmen. Eighty years later, SHS provides campus-wide health exams, inoculations and emergency health services.

"We are proud of the job that we do serving the health care needs of our students," said SHS Medical Laboratory Supervisor Jean Dorlack.

Students also commented on their SHS experiences.

"I was impressed," freshman Caitlin Nicoletto said. "A friend of mine sprained her ankle. We didn't have to wait long at all. They were really precise. They were really nice."

"They are very friendly and knowledgeable," freshman Miriam Ard said. "I did not have a bad experience."

College health certified registered nurse Anita Vissers, who worked for SHS from 1987 to 2002 remembers a public health issues regulation in 1989 and 1990. The campus experienced an outbreak the measles, an infectious disease, around spring.

"I think in that one week we had to give 800 measle shots," Vissers said.

According to Vissers, the outbreak was not limited to Marquette. Because this was nationwide, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention implemented the second vaccination for measles, mumps and rubella, which is now standard.

In the early 1990s, the SHS also experienced a Hepatitis A outbreak, according to Vissers and her former colleague, Carol Darrington, Rn. C. and nurse practitioner who retired last year. An employee of Subway, 1404 W. Wells St., caused the outbreak. The disease was stopped through ring vaccinations and with the help of Aurora Mt. Sinai Hospital and the Milwaukee Health Department.

In addition to the outbreaks, Darrington recalls her work at SHS.

"It was wonderful," Darrington said. "I loved it. Everybody that worked here was great. We had a goal to be compassionate."

Darrington also remembers her patients.

"I remember one student," Darrington said. "He was from New Mexico. He died, but he came here very often. They named a service after him — where you donate old furniture to students in apartments."

According to Mills, SHS is looking to expand its services in the future.

"Student health Services is continuing to deal with new freshman classes," Mills said. "We also have some potential to serve the university. If the university has health care needs, we'd like to think we have expertise for broader service.

The student health clinic was formerly known as the University Health Service, according to Mills. University Health Service changed its name to Student Health Service 54 years ago.

Its original location was the Marquette University Hospital, or Trinity Hospital, on the corner of North Ninth and West Wells streets. In 1932, the hospital closed, Mills said, and the clinic moved on campus to the Harriet L. Cramer School of Medicine. It still remains in the same building after 72 years. The medical school was renovated in 1978 and the entire structure was renamed the Walter Schroeder Health and Education Complex in 1981.

According to SHS records, the past directors of the SHS were Paul G. La Bissoniere, Mark W. Garry, Joseph W. Rastetter, Robert D. O'Connor, Harold I. Dobbs and Julie Jagemann.

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