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Georgetown cracks down on partying

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No, Georgetown isn't passing out free beer bongs and shot glasses. University officials are mandating that students register all their on-campus parties with the university before the weekend by Thursday at 10 a.,”Starting Oct. 1, Georgetown University students who wish to have a party on campus must visit the I Know How to Party Web site.

No, Georgetown isn't passing out free beer bongs and shot glasses. University officials are mandating that students register all their on-campus parties with the university before the weekend by Thursday at 10 a.m. Students must also attend a one hour information session before they have a party.

"Out of a concern for our students' safety, there were issues that were reviewed over the past year," said Julie Bataille, special assistant for public affairs at Georgetown. "Safety issues in terms of accessing buildings was a paramount concern."

However, Marquette won't be adopting the policy in the near future, said Jim McMahon, dean of the Office of Residence Life.

Georgetown's new policy says students are allowed one keg per party, must have two hosts over age 21 and limit the size of the party based on the living space.

Alcohol paraphernalia and equipment for drinking games, including beer pong tables and beer bongs, are also banned, said Chuck VanSant, director of off-campus housing.

"I don't think anyone will abide by this," said Danny Hathway, a freshman at Georgetown. "I've been to parties with three kegs."

Bataille said a number of students were involved in the process through university town hall meetings, individual conversations and disciplinary review committees.

Jesse Whitfield, also a freshman at Georgetown, however, said he was angry the university didn't involve the students more.

"It's a tradition at Georgetown that students have input," said Whitfield. "What really bothers me is they did this without the input of the students — it's just complete disregard — the gall they have."

Students have set up a table in Georgetown's campus square to protest the actions, said Hathway. A Facebook group, "Work Hard, Play Hard — GU Students for Stopping the Madness," is also petitioning against the policy and has around 1,400 members.

The creator, Pat DePoy, said on the Web site he thinks students will be subject to violence if they choose to party off campus, whereas on-campus parties are safer.

VanSant said parts of the new code do not apply to off-campus parties.

"The limit of one keg, the number of people in the house and registration does not apply to students living off campus," VanSant said. "But the other parts, noise, disturbance, underage consumption, alcohol paraphernalia and serving minors does."

At Marquette, having students register for parties has not been an issue, said McMahon.

"It is not something we would consider," McMahon said.

Although students do not have to register parties in university-owned apartments, they aren't allowed to have kegs, said Stacie Dooley, assistant dean for university apartments and off-campus student services. She also said the apartment leases do not specifically prohibit beer pong tables.

"Since the university has owned the apartments, these parties have calmed down considerably," Dooley said.

McMahon said beer pong tables, signs or other advertising, beer, wine or liquor container collections and shot glasses are all prohibited in residence halls.

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