Novelist to visit Caribbean conference

Milwaukee temperatures are dropping, but this week, students can warm up with Caribbean music, literature and theater.

The Conference on Caribbean Culture and Literature is sponsored by the Office of Foreign Languages and Literatures, the Office of Student Development and Caribe.

Caribe is a journal about the Spanish-speaking parts of the world and is published by Marquette in conjunction with Western Michigan University, said Armando González-Pérez, a professor of Spanish at Marquette.

The conference, in its first year, will begin Wednesday with Música de las Américas, a free concert by pianist Martha Marchena. Marchena will perform selections from the main composers of Latin America at 7:15 p.m. in the Weasler Auditorium, González-Pérez said.

On Thursday, Edgardo Rodríguez Juliá, a Puerto Rican author, will discuss his novel entitled "Ciudad letrada, ciudad caribeña," which means "Learn it City, Caribbean City," González-Pérez said. The lecture will be from 8:30 to 10 a.m. in the Weasler Auditorium.

At 7:30 p.m., Sandra García, president of the Theater in Miami Corporation, will present a documentary about Cuban theater in exile, González-Pérez said. The free event will be held in room 175 of Lalumiere Language Hall.

A discussion on Rodríguez Juliá's most recent narrative will be held from 8:30 to 10 a.m. Friday in Ballroom E of the Alumni Memorial Union, González-Pérez said.

From 3:30 to 6 p.m., a reading of contemporary Cuban poetry will be held in Ballroom E of the AMU. Participants include professors from New Mexico State University and London University.

At 7:30 p.m., students in the Spanish department will perform a dramatic reading of "Gas en los poros," or "Once Upon a Future." The play was written by Matías Montes Huidobro, who will be in attendance.

Students can see the play for free Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. in the Straz Theater, located in Straz Tower, he said. Friday's performance is open only to conference participants.

Raquel Aguilu de Murphy, associate professor of Spanish, said the conference is worthwhile because people in the United States know very little about Caribbean literature.

"Considering the amount of Latino people in the United States, I think it's important for students to become familiar with the culture and literature we have to offer them," she said.

Eufemia Sanchez de la Calle, associate professor of Spanish, said she encourages her students to attend at least one event held during Hispanic Heritage month.

Comments are closed